prokopetz:

lack-lustin:

professor-maple-art:

balatronical:

PAYPAL IS TRYING TO SLIP THE RUG UNDER US. Or they may have said this and just no one read about it or noticed/knew.

OKAY SO BEFORE YOU SEND ANY MONEY FOR THAT AWESOME COMMISSION YOU WANT TO BUY FROM THAT AWESOME ARTIST. PLEASE STOP AND READ THIS.

Paypal changed the look of how you will fill out information and send money. Thus, you need to be super careful. Don’t go all willy nilly through and be like “Yeah yeah yeah send” you need to stop when you see this screen right away.

Before you proceed, you will first notice one major thing: your address is showing. What you need to do if you are ordering a DIGITAL WORK (aka, it is being sent to you via the interwebz) is you need to click on your address and there around be a drop down menu of 3 (or more) options:

  • No address needed
  • Your Current Address
  • + Add a new shipping address

Be sure to select “No address needed”, it is very important that you do. If you leave your address in there, Paypal will assume that you are to receive a physical package. A physical package which needs proof that exists physically. Paypal will want the artist to provide shipping labels and tracking info on said package. This is bad, very, very bad. Artists can get in trouble if they cannot provide these things.

Please, if an artist asks to send you back your money so that you can send it again correctly, do not be offended. You are paying them to do your commission, how can they do your commission with no money?

Reblog this, send this around, if you want to make a proper tutorial go ahead, I hope this was clear enough as it is.

Important!!!

reblogging cause I had like 3 people do this lol, PLEASE DON’T!!

Alternatively, as an artist, you can avoid the issue in the first place by never asking your clients to send you money directly. If you receive money via Paypal, always use Paypal’s “Create an Invoice” feature – not “Request Money”; the button that actually says “Create an Invoice” – to issue an invoice to the client. Include a detailed breakdown of services and fees in the invoice items section,  and clearly state the agreed-upon method of delivery in the “Terms & Conditions” box.

Apart from avoiding potential confusion regarding the method of delivery, this has the added benefit of getting the particulars of your arrangement on record as a binding contract in the event of any disputes or spurious chargebacks, as well as automatically generating receipts for tax purposes.

(You are claiming your income from online commissions on your income taxes, right? If you’re not, you could be missing some very lucrative deductions; all those art supplies and expenses are tax-deductible, potentially including not only the depreciated cost of the computer and/or tablet you do your digital work on, but a portion of your rent, property tax and/or utility bills based on what percentage of your dwelling’s square footage is devoted to studio space.)

The client will be asked for a shipping address when paying the invoice, but that’s just for record-keeping purposes. And before you ask, yes, for legal reasons you always want to get an address on record; if a client balks at providing one, that’s a sign you may be looking at a scam – or worse, an underage kid trying to commission something that could get you in legal hot water.